Blog posts from members of the team

Literature review update

Having previously blogged about registering the literature review see here the team have subsequently spent the last few weeks diligently searching numerous literature databases. We have also reviewed several hundred titles, abstracts and full text of papers.Time, therefore for an update on progress.

A reminder that the scope of the narrative review is to search and critique research studies of workplace initiatives designed to promote speaking-up, and responding to speaking-up. Initiatives within healthcare and other industries/sectors are of interest. Some of the headlines from the review include:

  • Overall, the quality of the research is poor.
  • We have broadly divided studies into reports of
    • Educational initiatives – speak-up learning interventions undertaken within universities with undergraduate students.
    • Workplace initiatives: speak-up interventions undertaken within workplaces not involving formal training or educational input.
    • Workplace/workforce training initiatives: mostly voluntary, occasionally mandatory enrolment of employees onto formal training courses, often involving simulated practices and/or team-working interventions.
  • There were no published, peer review studies of initiatives resembling the Freedom to Speak Up Guardian (FTSUG) role.

However, as we have learnt from our interviews (more of which in the next blog post) FTSUGs design and implement speak-up training initiatives and undertake a variety of workplace initiatives to promote speaking-up. Therefore, the review of literature will be useful in terms of helping us understand some of these activities. We are preparing a paper for submission in the new year to an internationally acclaimed peer reviewed journal.

Grey literature

We are also undertaking a review of grey literature. Grey literature publications are usually not from peer reviewed academic journals. This can include policy documents and reports/evaluations of speaking-up initiatives by organisations, charities and commercial companies. The team have identified speak-up initiatives from various sectors such as humanitarian aid, telecommunications and law enforcements. We are always on the lookout for more, so please get in touch if you know of any interesting grey literature in this area.

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Literature review update

Having previously blogged about registering the literature review see here the team have subsequently spent the last few …